INADEQUATE INFRASTRUCTURE

road construction

Collier Commissioners show Lee the way on Impact Fees

While Collier is building funds for infrastructure to handle expected growth, Lee commissioners just build an infrastructure deficit by continuing to under-collect impact fees… ensuring a future of crowded roads, inadequate services and more burden on existing taxpayers. Collier gets it right… so when will Lee commissioners get it? Originally Published in the Naples Daily…

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Eden Oak

Citizens oppose development that would destroy acres of mangroves

The controversial project near Shell Point  would destroy 36 acres of mangroves. After a strong show of opposition, the county hearing was continued until January 7 to allow rebuttal from applicant. Originally published in the News-Press on Dec. 6, 2019 by Bill Smith Opponents of a plan to remove mangroves on the shore of the…

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oak village

Commissioners continue attack on low-density lifestyle

In a decision that overruled both neighbors’ concerns and adjacent land uses, Lee County commissioners approved a high-density development plan in the middle of much lower density neighborhoods near Six Mile Cypress Parkway. In a 3-2 vote Dec. 4, the board approved a proposal for 262 units on 21 acres – almost three times more…

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impact fees

Commissioners, raise Lee’s impact fees!

Growth (not today’s taxpayers) must pay for growth – a lesson Collier County learned and Lee County ignored by deeply discounting impact fees meant to pay for crucial infrastructure needed to meet the demands of today development. By looking at Collier’s lesson, we see that Lee’s failure to collect full impact fees has left the…

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urban infill

Urban infill in Collier County leading the way

Kudos to the Naples Daily News for showing its support for Collier County’s recent redevelopment approvals that are turning old commercial centers into new housing units. Not only does this repurpose developed (but abandoned) land for a more urgent need, but it encourages development where the infrastructure (roads, utilities, services) already exists to support it…

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Eden Oak

Eden Oak Workshop for Hearing Participants

Workshop for ParticipantsFriday, Nov. 22, at 4 p.m.Shell Point Social CenterRSVP: rawessel@sccf.org If you’re concerned about development impacting the fragile wetlands in Punta Rassa, about building more structures in a Coastal High Hazard area, or adding more traffic to an already overburdened evacuation route, the Sanibel Captiva Conservation Foundation is holding a workshop to help…

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conservation 2020

Lee Future urges Florida legislature to fully fund Florida Forever

Lee Future is one of 141 civic, environmental and other organizations from throughout Florida urging the Florida Legislature to approve legislation that will once again fully fund Florida Forever. The state’s premier land conservation program has been grossly underfunded these last 10 years, ever since the Great Recession of 2008. This program, if fully funded, could…

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road closed ahead

Lee County Commission’s impact fees reduction policy has resulted in $137 million in lost revenues to date

…and 3 ½  more years of losses to come! By the time the current impact fee reduction ordinance expires in March 2023, the total impact fee revenues lost could be more than a quarter of a billion dollars. Today Lee Future is releasing the latest Quarterly Impact Fee Revenues Report.  This report documents the actual…

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The villages

The Villages Proves Growth Does Not Pay for Itself

An object lesson from The Villages (fastest growing metro area in the U.S.) about the consequences of rapid growth without infrastructure and revenues to pay for it. A reminder that Lee County’s 10-year policy of slashing impact fees on new developments will come home to roost in the not too distant future, and it’s the…

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gridlock, transportation, traffic

Growth vs. Gridlock: A Head-On Collision Ahead

Lee County’s transportation planning and budgeting process has long been a behind-the-scenes staff-controlled process that is incomprehensible to the average citizen. As a result, there is no effort to educate the public about how either the “big picture” or the “local impact” on transportation works and how citizens can have a voice in the process….

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